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Energize CT Center

 
Type
Town
 
Category
  • Education
  • Training

The Energize Connecticut Center closed its doors on December 31, 2019. 

Additional Details

The Energize Connecticut Center closed its doors on December 31, 2019.

Eversource and United Illuminating continue to offer educations programs through the eesmarts program.

Additionally, we offer energy-saving solutions and encourage you to continue learning about the ways you can save money and energy. Stay connected to EnergizeCT.com and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Connecticut Green LEAF Schools

 
Type
Town
 
Category
  • Community Involvement
  • Education

The Connecticut Green LEAF Schools program guides and recognizes schools for striving to provide effective environmental and sustainability education; to improve the health and wellness of students and staff; and to reduce environmental impacts and costs.

Additional Details

The Connecticut Green LEAF Schools program guides and recognizes schools for striving to provide effective environmental and sustainability education; to improve the health and wellness of students and staff; and to reduce environmental impacts and costs.

Academic Benefits

Environmental education contributes to overall academic achievement and higher performance on standardized tests when it is integrated into the curriculum. Students learn more effectively within a real-world, experiential-based context combined with traditional textbook-based approaches. The inquiry-based approach, with students learning about environment, sustainability and how their communities function, helps prepare students for future careers.

Health Benefits

Going green offers many health benefits for students and staff, including improved nutrition and physical health. Focus on healthy eating, physical activity and healthy environments pays off in decreased obesity, asthma and other illnesses while increasing attendance.

Reduced Costs

Green schools are energy efficient, have lower utility costs, conserve resources and reduce waste. Savings on energy, waste and water is money that can bolster academic programs.

Download the Connecticut Green LEAF Schools Brochure.

For questions about the Connecticut Green LEAF program contact ctgreenleaf@ctgreenschools.org.

Visit the Connecticut Green LEAF Schools program website to learn more.

CT Green LEAF is an ongoing program, with opportunities for continuous improvement. All K-12 schools in Connecticut are eligible to participate. All participating schools will be recognized.

Every school is unique and starts at a different level. CT Green LEAF can help all schools on their journey to becoming green with the following levels:

  • Planting Seeds (level 1): For schools assessing their baselines and developing green plans. This level lays the foundation for a more sustainable school community in the future.
  • Growing Green (level 2): For schools that have made progress in all seven steps and qualify for CT Green LEAF School status. Exemplary schools would be eligible for federal Green Ribbon recognition.

The Application Process

Sign ups start in September 2012. Schools can join at anytime.

The application process for all schools:

  1. A school is interested in joining the CT Green LEAF Program and the principal signs on to Level 1 Principal's Commitment or Level 2 Principal's Committment.
  2. The school notifies CT Green LEAF of their commitment and initiates their green team.
  3. Within a month, the school green team completes and submits the Self-Assessment Tool (Word) (fillable PDF). If your school scores at 60-100 (or will score at this level by January 2013), you may be eligible for nomination to the Green Ribbon Award! If you score at this level, you should consider applying. If you are not quite there yet, see CT Green LEAF Resources.

    Resources and supports are provided to help schools improve in all areas, including webinars, discussion boards, mentors, and professional development opportunities. Participating agencies are sharing their expertise to help schools.

    Your green team can work together to choose areas in the 3 goals and 7 steps to work on to make the school greener. Follow the "Roadmap" step-by-step guides to the 7 steps. The greening process is continuous improvement.

If your school did score well on the Self-Assessment:

  1. The school can commit to completing the CT Green LEAF Application. Mentors are available to help you with this process! Contact ctgreenleaf@ctgreenschools.org by December 10, 2012, to connect with a mentor. Completed applications are due by January 11, 2013.
  2. The Connecticut Green LEAF team will make selections for awardees for the Connecticut Green LEAF awards, and nominees to the Green Ribbon Schools Award Program by February 15, 2012. All applicants will be notified of their status.

Connecticut Green LEAF Awardees and Nominees to Green Ribbon Schools Award will be recognized at the Connecticut Outdoor and Environmental Education Conference held on March 13, 2013, at Central Connecticut State University.

Green Ribbon Awards will be announced by the U.S. Department of Education on April 22, 2013. Awardees are invited to attend the ceremony in Washington DC on June 3, 2013.

For questions about the Connecticut Green LEAF program contact ctgreenleaf@ctgreenschools.org.

The 7 steps of the Connecticut Green LEAF Schools program include:

1. Green and Healthy Outlook

Maintain a green and healthy outlook (participation, your green team, building partnerships)

2. Environmental and Sustainability Literacy

Incorporating developmentally appropriate environmental and sustainability literacy in your curriculum.

Measure outcomes of program effectiveness and assess student learning about environmental and sustainability literacy.

Support professional development about environmental and sustainability literacy for all staff.

3. Healthy School Environment

Implement and maintain EPA's Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools program.

Comply with or exceed all CT school-based environmental health laws.

4. Healthy Nutrition

Comply with nutrition standards in National School Breakfast and Lunch Programs.

Encourage healthy eating practices including vegetarian/vegan options and use of school-grown or local, organic foods. Incorporate healthy nutrition into the curriculum.

5. Physical Well-Being

Assess and promote physical health including outdoor opportunities for all students and staff. Incorporate physical health in the curriculum.

6. Energy Efficiency and Water Conservation

Complete Energy Star Benchmarking.

Reduce building energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. Use of renewable energy sources. Include energy concepts into the curriculum.

Reduce energy use from transportation by encouraging walking, biking, public transportation and carpooling to/from school by students and staff.

Conserve water and ensure a clean water supply. Incorporate water issues into the curriculum.

7. Green Purchasing and Waste Management

Assess the school community's purchasing policies and adopt a green policy.

Implement a plan to measure and reduce waste. Incorporate waste management issues into the curriculum.

Forming a School Green Team

Each school is different, with unique goals and resources. You should consider including people from all levels, and from many different areas of the school in your Green Team. Think about who your "champions” are, and don't forget to place an open invitation to your school community to recruit members.

Administrators:

It is great to have someone on your team who works at or near the top! These people understand the complexities of your organization, and are in contact with those who can make changes happen. Consider including administrators from the district level if this is appropriate for your school and projects you'd like to do. These administrators might also act as consultants as needed.

Teachers:

You need to include teaching staff on your team. Your teacher representatives should be good at communicating, and be able to get project support from their peers.

Facility Staff:

This category includes janitors and custodians, as well as kitchen staff. Depending on your projects, you will need to tap knowledge in these areas to succeed in your greening efforts. These folk also have a wealth of knowledge about how the school works (or doesn't!)

Students:

No school project can succeed without including students! All projects can also be enriched by using the project as part of the curriculum. If your school has multiple grades, student representatives should come from all levels. Make sure that student voices are heard, and that your student representatives have received training on how to participate in the team conversations.

Parents/Families:

Consider including the extended school family, PTA/PTO members, or even school board in your Green Team. They have a unique view of the school and can be valuable supporters.

Communities:

Your neighborhood or town community may also add value to your Green Team activities. Your team may focus on projects that need community support. For example, your school garden project may benefit from the Garden Club, local master gardeners through your Extension Center, a local landscaper, or other community interests. Community members might act as members of your Green Team, or as consultants and partners as needed.

Next Steps

Once you have your team, it is time to start (or review) your Green LEAF Self-Assessment Tool. From there, the team can identify areas they would like to school to work on. Depending on the team's energy, you might choose a couple of initiative to start on. Check out the Roadmaps to help your plan your next steps for each topic area.

As your team identifies the challenges they want to work on, be sure to look for partners to help with that work — maybe recruiting a grade level to estimate or measure trash and provide that calculation to the team, or working with the PTO on a schoolyard clean-up project. Each new partnership add workers, interest and investment in your school's greening adventure!

GRS Logo

Green Ribbon Schools is a U.S. Department of Education recognition program for K-12 schools that have made significant progress in reducing their environmental impact, improving student and staff health, and providing effective environmental education.

This recognition award is part of a larger U.S. Department of Education effort to identify and disseminate knowledge about practices proven to result in improved student engagement, academic achievement, graduation rates, and workforce preparedness, as well as a government-wide aim to increase energy independence and economic security.

Nominations

Connecticut's State Department of Education can nominate up to four Green LEAF schools for the Green Ribbon Schools award.

The process for nomination includes the following steps:

  1. A school is interested in joining the CT Green LEAF Program and the principal signs on to Level 1 Principal's Commitment or Level 2 Principal's Committment.
     
  2. The school notifies CT Green LEAF of their commitment and initiates their green team.
     
  3. Within a month, the school green team completes and submits the Self-Assessment Tool (Word) (fillable PDF). If your school scores at 60-100 (or will score at this level by January 2013), you may be eligible for nomination to the Green Ribbon Award! If you score at this level, you should consider applying. If you are not quite there yet, see CT Green LEAF Resources.

    Resources and supports are provided to help schools improve in all areas, including webinars, discussion boards, mentors, and professional development opportunities. Participating agencies are sharing their expertise to help schools. 

    Your green team can work together to choose areas in the 3 goals and 7 steps to work on to make the school greener. Follow the "Roadmap" step-by-step guides to the 7 steps. The greening process is continuous improvement.

    If the school scored high on the Self-Assessment, they may be on track for nomination as a Green Ribbon School.
     
  4. The school can commit to completing the CT Green LEAF Application. Mentors are available to help you with this process! Contact ctgreenleaf@ctgreenschools.org by December 10, 2012 to connect with a mentor. Completed applications are due by January 11, 2013.
     
  5. The Connecticut Green LEAF team will make selections for awardees for the Connecticut Green LEAF awards, and nominees to the Green Ribbon Schools Award Program by February 15, 2012. All applicants will be notified of their status.

Connecticut Green LEAF Awardees and Nominees to Green Ribbon Schools Award will be recognized at the Connecticut Outdoor and Environmental Education Conference held on March 13, 2013 at Central Connecticut State University. Green Ribbon Awards will be announced by the US Department of Education on April 22, 2013. Awardees are invited to attend the ceremony in Washington DC on June 3, 2013.

For questions about the Connecticut Green LEAF program contact ctgreenleaf@ctgreenschools.org.

 

Museum Partnerships

 
Type
Town
 
Category
  • Community Involvement
  • Education

Get ready for hands-on experiences learning about energy, conservation, renewable energy and the benefits of smart energy choices at museums, science centers and other locations around Connecticut.

Additional Details

As part of the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund’s educational and public outreach efforts, several interactive exhibits related to energy, energy efficiency and clean renewable energy sources are available to visitors throughout the state. These exhibits engage museum visitors, students and educators to explore the technologies and science related to the topics of energy conservation, efficiency, renewable energy and protecting our environment.

Partnering with key educational museums, science centers, technical high schools and municipalities across the state, these exhibits raise awareness in school-age children, educators and parents about the economic and environmental benefits of energy efficiency.

  • Energize CT Center, North Haven - an interactive, professionally staffed facility that combines displays, educational tours, and a resource center to educate and empower the residents of Connecticut about energy. 
  • Connecticut Science Center, Hartford -  make sure to visit their Energy City Gallery.
  • The Discovery Museum, Bridgeport -  their energy exhibit showcases the different sources of energy, including renewable and nonrenewable sources.
  • Stepping Stones Museum for Children, Norwalk - learn about the science of energy.
  • E-House - designed and built by students and faculty of the Connecticut Technical High School System, each E-House incorporates solar and energy-efficient technologies.
Call 877-WISE-USE (877-947-3873) for more information.

The Energy City Gallery is a model sustainable community named “Greenslope” featuring energy-efficient technologies and renewable energy sources that power buildings, instead of fossil fuels. The family-friendly gallery on the 6th floor of the Connecticut Science Center contains exhibits on sustainability, product life cycles, efficient windows, passive solar design, energy-efficient appliances and lights, green building or LEED design, wind, solar photovoltaics, biomass and fossil fuels. The multi-media exhibits illustrate the relationship between carbon dioxide emissions and energy consumption, and the interactive exhibits emphasize to students, educators and families the importance of being smart about the energy we use.

The gallery is jointly sponsored by the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund and the Clean Energy Finance & Investment Authority. Visit www.ctsciencecenter.org for more information.

Call 877-WISE-USE (877-947-3873) for more information. 

The Discovery Museum, Bridgeport

The museum’s energy exhibit showcases the different sources of energy, including renewable and nonrenewable sources, and allows visitors to actively participate in the generation, transmission, distribution and conservation of energy.

Museum visitors can become energy smart by interacting with displays on four types of energy sources—fossil fuels, hydropower, solar panels and wind turbines. These sources then “generate” electricity and are transmitted through power lines to our homes, schools and businesses. Inside the energy exhibit’s home, visitors must choose to use efficient or inefficient appliances and see how the electric demand changes on the home’s meter.  Visit www.discoverymuseum.org for more information.

Stepping Stones Museum for Children, Norwalk

The Energy Lab Gallery is an immersive solar, wind and water environment that sets the stage for children and museum visitors to learn about the science of energy—its sources, uses, and emerging alternatives.

Featured exhibits:

  • Energy Wall - displays potential/kinetic energy, energy transformations and renewable/nonrenewable energy sources.

  • Water Lab – explores the water cycle and hydropower. 

  • Wind Tunnel – allows visitors to feel the force of wind and manipulate wind turbine blades to find the most efficient configurations and invent new designs. 

  • Solar Lab – illuminates how energy from the Sun helps plants grow, heats homes and powers cars. 

  • Non Renewable Lab – features a trip below the surface of the earth to see where fossil fuels come from.

Traveling Conservation Quest mini-exhibit & tour

As part of the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund’s partnership with Stepping Stones, a mini, portable exhibit on energy efficiency and renewable energy sources was created to travel to approximately 40 schools, libraries and community centers across the state free-of-charge to municipalities, schools and organizations.

For more information on Stepping Stones and its energy exhibits, visit www.steppingstonesmuseum.org

The E-House Initiative

Since 2006, the Connecticut Technical High School System has partnered with the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund and Clean Energy Finance & Investment Authority to provide training on energy-efficient and renewable energy technologies for the schools’ architectural, carpentry, electrical and plumbing faculty and students.

Designed and built by students and faculty, each E-House, a 16’ x 20’ structure, incorporates solar photovoltaic and solar thermals systems, weatherization and energy-efficient technologies and labs in its design. The E-House initiative gives students the opportunity to conduct hands-on field work and earn professional certifications in these various labs, preparing them for a “green” career after graduation.

There are currently 7 operating E-Houses located at Technical High Schools throughout Connecticut.

eesmarts

 
Type
Town
 
Category
  • Education

It’s never been easier–or more important–to teach K-12 students about energy efficiency, conservation and clean, renewable energy.

Additional Details

Its vision is to facilitate students’ understanding of the science, math and technology related to clean, renewable energy and electricity in order to create an energy-efficient ethic among all school-age students in Connecticut.

Through its K-12 curriculum, eesmarts helps educators and schools teach the importance of becoming energy smart by providing free professional development in-class lessons, and outreach on energy, energy efficiency, renewable energy and electricity.

The eesmarts curriculum fully aligns with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), and Common Core Standards for Math and English Language Arts.

Professional Development Workshops

Professional development workshops are provided free-of-charge to educators across the state of Connecticut for grades kindergarten through high school.

Both district and general workshops are offered. Upon completion of an eesmarts workshop, teachers can request lesson materials for their classes at no cost.

Workshops are interactive and cross-disciplinary, providing educators with NGSS three-dimensional learning through activities and hands-on explorations, just as their students will perform their classrooms. Workshops are presented by Capitol Region Education Council (CREC).

Lessons

eesmarts lessons are fully aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), and Common Core Standards for Math and English Language Arts.

Each lesson features a detailed lesson plan with live links, materials for classrooms, hands-on activities, extensions and evaluation tools. Lessons are flexible, interdisciplinary and the program fits seamlessly into any class curriculum.

For information regarding specific workshops and lesson materials, please call toll free 877-514-2594.

In an effort to engage energy efficiency messages at the student level, eesmarts. offers in-class lessons on energy conservation, energy efficiency and how to be energy smart.

In-class lessons are currently available for Connecticut elementary schools (public and private) with a focus on schools in distressed municipalities

Call 877-514-2594 for more information. 

The annual eesmarts contest invites students to answer grade level-specific prompts regarding how they would promote energy efficiency, renewable energy and reducing their carbon footprints to their families, fellow students and schools.

Students express their energy smarts through a variety of formats, including poems, news articles, posters, speeches and even plays and TV scripts. All contest prompts align with the Connecticut State Frameworks in science, mathematics and writing.

Participants receive recognition for their submissions and winners will be honored at a special awards ceremony.

For more information, call 877-514-2594.

eesmarts is an annual sponsor of the Sustainable Resources and Practices (Middle School), Future Sustainability (High School) and the Alternative/Renewable Energy categories at the Connecticut Science Fair.

Projects considered for these categories aim to find practical solutions to our world’s problems by identifying specific ways that individuals and communities can utilize sustainable processes, products and technologies to help protect the environment for future generations.

Prizes are awarded for first, second and third place projects. 

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